Bureau of Land Management National Park Service US Fish and Wildlife Service US Forest Service

Delaware River (Lower), New Jersey, Pennsylvania

Managing Agency:

National Park Service, Philadelphia Office


Designated Reach:

November 1, 2000. Several segments of the Delaware River and its tributaries: 1) from river mile 193.8 to the northern border of the city of Easton, Pennsylvania; 2) from just south of the Gilbert Generating Station to just north of the Point Pleasant Pumping Station; 3) from just south of the Point Pleasant Pumping Station to a point 1,000 feet north of the Route 202 Bridge; 4) from 1,750 feet south of the Route 202 Bridge to the southern boundary of the town of New Hope, Pennsylvania, to the town of Washington Crossing, Pennsylvania; 5) all of Tinicum Creek; 6) Tohickon Creek from the Lake Nockamixon Dam to the Delaware River; and 7) Paunacussing Creek in Solebury Township.


Classification/Mileage:

Scenic — 25.4 miles; Recreational — 41.9 miles; Total — 67.3 miles.

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Delaware River (Lower)

The lower Delaware River possesses a great diversity of significant resources. A high density of population and recreational opportunities combine with a wealth of natural, cultural and historic features of national significance. The river valley contains habitats that do not occur elsewhere in the region. For example, there are sheer cliffs that rise 400 feet above the river. Southern facing cliffs are desert-like and home to prickly pear cactus. North-facing cliffs exhibit flora and fauna usually found only in arctic-alpine climates. The river itself provides habitat for American shad, striped bass, and river herring. The river is an important component of the Atlantic Flyway, one of four major waterfowl routes in North America. From an historic viewpoint, the river is one of the most significant corridors in the nation. The corridor contains buildings used during Washington's famous crossing, historic navigation canals, Native American and colonial era archaeological sites and mills. Just as important is the magnificent scenery in the river corridor.